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Rocket Fuel in Your Water

No, this is not about the latest energy drink.

The Environmental Protection Agency has decided not to rid drinking water of a toxic rocket fuel ingredient called perchlorate that can be found in public water supplies around the country. The scuttlebutt suggests that the Department of Defense would be seriously on the hook if EPA did go after this chemical.

At least three bills already introduced in Congress go after the perchlorate problem.

S. 24, the Perchlorate Monitoring and Right-to-Know Act would amend the Safe Drinking Water Act to require a health advisory and monitoring of drinking water for perchlorate. Cost: about $0.20 per U.S. family.

S. 150, the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children From Perchlorate Act would simply require a health advisory and drinking water standard for perchlorate. Cost: about $0.04 per U.S. family.

In the House, H.R. 1747, the Safe Drinking Water for Healthy Communities Act, would require a national primary drinking water regulation for perchlorate, the thing the EPA just declined to do. No cost estimate on that yet.

So if you don’t want perchlorate in your drinking water or your pregnant friends, one of these may be bill for you. Here’s the current vote on each. Click to vote, comment, learn more, or edit the wiki articles about the bills.

Visitor Comments for Rocket Fuel in Your Water RSS 2.0

Marc

Just because the EPA is not regulating this chemical does not mean the states can not. Every state has drinking water regs. Not every state has to worry about perchlorate (or even every area within a state). There is a cost to testing, and if the area does not need to worry about perchlorate, why force them to test?

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