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P.L. 112-29, The America Invents Act (6 comments ↓ | 13 wiki edits: view article ↓)

  • This item is from the 112th Congress (2011-2012) and is no longer current. Comments, voting, and wiki editing have been disabled, and the cost/savings estimate has been frozen.

H.R. 1249 would amend title 35, United States Code, to provide for patent reform.

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    Costs: $520.84 per
    and decreases their $162,301.27 share of the national debt by $6.75.
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  • There was no up-or-down vote in the House.

  • There was no up-or-down vote in the Senate.

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Visitor Comments Comments Feed for This Bill

Josh Taylor

June 22, 2011, 6:24am (report abuse)

This bill will stifle creativity. If a child invents something a company claims ownership to but doesn't exist, goes to jail. In other words, you invent something new, a company files a patent infringement on your original invention, you go to jail.

VOTE NO.

Phil Clutts

July 11, 2011, 4:12pm (report abuse)

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution gives inventors exclusive rights to their discoveries until the inventions goes into the public domain. Our patent system, unique in the world, is the reason the country has produced most of the world’s great inventions and dominates the world in innovation. To give ownership of an invention to the “first-to-file” is not only unfair to the inventor, it is unconstitutional. It opens the door to Chinese hackers to steal U.S. innovation secrets while they are still in development, then file an application with the U.S. Patent Office under first-to-file, and thereby own new U.S. technology instead of merely stealing it.

I borrowed from the Phyllis Schlafly Report for this. You can read more at http://www.eagleforum.org/psr/2011/june11/psrjune11.html.

Barry W. Shook

September 6, 2011, 2:47pm (report abuse)

The "first-to-file" law is unconstitutional. It opens the door to theft and deceit everywhere. We need to protect the inventors; not protect the thieves.

Arcjhie Haase

September 6, 2011, 3:04pm (report abuse)

This is another example of corporate hacks writing legislation for the Congress. At some point government has to come home to it's people.

Sean Hennessy

September 6, 2011, 9:48pm (report abuse)

Am I misinterpreting this or something? It sounds to me like this bill would be essentially stripping the inventor of the rights he has to his own creation. What is the rationale behind taking away someone's intellectual property? Who is arguing FOR this bill?

Stephanie Saggerson

September 12, 2011, 3:58am (report abuse)

To Josh - if a child "invents" something and a company has already patented the idea, they didn't invent anything. They just built what someone else was thinking.

To Archie - this bill has bipartisan support, and is trying to help with job growth by making the patent process easier, more expedient, and matched with today's technology. Small and large businesses need patents to protect intellectual property, and allows them to grow as a business, growing new jobs and job sectors along the way. This is so the people can get employed again.

To Sean - Did you read this bill or someone else's take on it? This bill has provisions that allow people to experiment with their idea a year before filing, and also has derivation proceedings if someone attempts to or has patented your invention, and allows it to be straightened out. There are no references or implications that an inventor would lose rights to his own creation. This bill makes it easier to protect the inventor.

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